Sunday, September 17, 2006

A Little Cheese with that Whine?

Participants in my writing workshops have heard me get on my soapbox about the value and power of a good rubric. (In fact – I rarely limit this to my writing workshops, this is how strongly I feel on the topic!) I firmly believe that we need to provide students with explicit criteria for their success in order to give them a fair shot in education. To that point – I have often shared a rubric on whining that I have internalized when working with teachers and students!!

Via A Year of Reading I found this great companion piece to the rubric which would also make a great listening/note-taking exercise for students. NPR recently held an interview on “The Joys and Perils of Whining at Work’ with Renee Montagne. This 3 ½ minute snippet is great for students to use with 2 column notes (Step Up to Writing strategy). I also envision students writing their own “whines” (voice!), writing their own rules for “Whining in the Classroom” (voice, organization, ideas), or making their own “Joys and Perils of (BLANK) in school podcast (ideas, voice, integration of technology!!)

I am still playing with how I might use this myself but the ideas are certainly flowing – look for it in a workshop soon!




Image from The New Zealand Herald, "Work, the horror of it all."

8 comments:

LisaG said...

Hi Theresa. I am going to use the rubrics you gave at our workshop for a grad class I am teaching on Tuesday. I think it will be a nice lead in for people who are unfamilar with Step Up and another piece for the veterans.

LisaG said...

Hi Theresa. I am going to use the rubrics you gave at our workshop for a grad class I am teaching on Tuesday. I think it will be a nice lead in for people who are unfamilar with Step Up and another piece for the veterans.

SLagana said...

Hi this is Dana testing the site for Sue- Dana

SLagana said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
SLagana said...

Dear Theresa,

This blogging is a nightmare for me. Thanks to Dana she helped me get on. She has spent way too much of her valuable time helping me. I hope I can keep this up.

I just wanted to tell you that I'm working on point of view. We are going to read ELEVEN. Thanks for the tip.

Sue

melodee said...

Theresa I love this idea. I just want to tell you that we have begun using the rubrics we created in the high school over the summer. We took your advice and created one that will be used by grades 6-12. We used the example that you gave Marcy and I as a starting point. Thanks for all your help. The exemplar papers that are going to be created at each grade will give the students the opportunity to see what each domain looks like on the rubric for each level (6 point scale). I definitely think it is a start. I am sure as we proceed we will be making some changes. I will bring them to Tovani's workshop so that you can see them.

Mary Lee said...

Wow! You found a great classroom application for that piece on whining that I heard on NPR! Bravo!

Hey, I don't want to throw a wrench in your rubric gears, but have you read Maja Wilson's RETHINKING RUBRICS (Heinemann)? It has rocked my thinking about rubrics in writing...

Theresa G said...

Mary Lee!
I love it when someone pushes my thinking!! I have checked out the first chapter of the book online and between the author's voice (WOW!) and the conversation around the phrase "best practice" I am hooked!

While I disagree with her perceptions of the 6 Traits rubric (obviously) have had similar negative experiences with rubrics. However, I find that their value lies in the fact that it allows us to give students explicit criteria to help improve their writing. By explicit - I mean clear, communicated criteria that is backed up with loads and loads of examples. Too often, we keep our expectations and the means to improve writing a teacher secret!! (Although I must admit that I do not share my dating rubric with anyone except my friends after yet another horrendous first date!!)

I've added the book to my Amazon wish-list- which will become reality with my next paycheck. Thanks for the resource and don't be a stranger!